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Palek03
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28 Aug 2008, 2:08 am

I have Asperger's Syndrome (AS). I also have this odd accent on my voice that no one who hears it can identify it. Does anyone else on here with Aspergers, or another form of High functioning Autism, get told they have an accent that is seemingly unidentifiable while their parents have none?

Just wondering if this is a side effect of AS or if Im just special.



dougn
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28 Aug 2008, 2:12 am

Well I have a friend (online, never met in real life, but I've heard him speak) who has AS and he has a very distinctive voice. I'm not sure if I'd call it an accent. He enunciates very strongly/clearly, more so than most people, and his voice is very monotonous, but if I had to describe his accent I'd say it's a very mild southern US accent. I have no idea what his parents' accents are like.



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28 Aug 2008, 3:49 am

I have AS and I do the same thing. I seem to pick up bits and pieces of accents from people I meet. The mixture comes out kind of strange. I get asked all the time where I'm from, and I live in the same town I was born in.



tomamil
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28 Aug 2008, 4:05 am

n4mwd wrote:
I have AS and I do the same thing. I seem to pick up bits and pieces of accents from people I meet. The mixture comes out kind of strange. I get asked all the time where I'm from, and I live in the same town I was born in.

my accent also changes depending on with whom i speak. specially with people from Britain, i just love their accent. i live abroad for six years now and when i come home to visit my family they notice that even my original accent in my native language changed. but that's not AS related. i don't use my native language that much anymore. as a result, i don't master any language perfectly.


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Ishmael
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28 Aug 2008, 5:01 am

I'm an Australian, but because of the way Aspergers makes me speak, people always mistake me for an American! For you Americans reading and unaware of your accent (one tank once said Americans don't have accents!) you, typically - you yourselves know how it varies state to state - speak in a slow drawl, overly enunciating words. That's pretty much a common way to speak as an Asperger. Australians, unlike what you've seen in the movies, speak fast, abbreviate, half-pronounce and constantly use verbal shortcuts.
I hate it when I'm asked what part of America I am from!


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2ukenkerl
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28 Aug 2008, 5:24 am

Ishmael wrote:
I'm an Australian, but because of the way Aspergers makes me speak, people always mistake me for an American! For you Americans reading and unaware of your accent (one tank once said Americans don't have accents!) you, typically - you yourselves know how it varies state to state - speak in a slow drawl, overly enunciating words. That's pretty much a common way to speak as an Asperger. Australians, unlike what you've seen in the movies, speak fast, abbreviate, half-pronounce and constantly use verbal shortcuts.
I hate it when I'm asked what part of America I am from!


When you said tank, did you mean yank? I guess the people that have boston accents can claim that others that pronounce their Rs, etc... have accents, etc..., or non Americans could say our pronounciation of SCH is an accent.

I have sometimes said things in a way that it sounds like I have another accent, but certainly not consistantly. There are, supposedly, syndromes, or whatever, that cause people to consistantly do so.



BPalmer
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28 Aug 2008, 5:25 am

Although I've lived in Australia for 24 years (having come here from New Zealand*), occasionally New Zealand or English intonations will randomly make their way into my speech. People have sometimes said I have an English-sounding accent. Once a bus driver thought I was South African!

(*The Australian and NZ accents have more similarities to each other than, say, Liverpool and Received Pronunciation)



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28 Aug 2008, 6:19 am

Somebody thought you were south African?
But suith ifricaens ill spiel luke thes! How culd yu bi mistakin?

Y pot above; damned iPhone! Mean to say yank! Don't autocorrect that!


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Anniemaniac
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28 Aug 2008, 6:25 am

My accent and manner of speech has often cropped up in conversations.

As a child, people told me that I spoke too fast. I speak at a normal rate, if you ask me.

My accent is always changing and coming out in weird ways on random words. I'm English but someone once asked me if I was from Canada. I've never been there. I didn't even know what the Canadian accent sounded like at the time. I find it easy to fall into accents if I spend enough time around it, but I can't put on accents when I'm purposely trying to.



Dragonfly_Dreams
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28 Aug 2008, 6:43 am

I change my accent depending on who I'm talking to, or where I am. Like a confusing mix of tons of different ones. People tell me I talk with a weird accent all the time. I'm told I talk too fast as well.



MemberSix
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28 Aug 2008, 7:08 am

tomamil wrote:
my accent also changes depending on with whom i speak. specially with people from Britain, i just love their accent.

Funny, I do just the same with Americans ... waaay cooler accent than a LOT of English accents (sound like uncool dorks).

So when with Americans, my accent is de-Anglicised for American - and when with pikies/chavs (English underclass/workingclass) my accent becomes less middle-class ... basically because the underclass here is pretty hostile to anyone with a middle-class accent.
You see, while America is a nation divided by race - England is a nation divided by class.

That said, when I'm with Scots, my accent stays exactly what it naturally is (which is MC English with some of the dorkier sounds substituted with barely perceptibly American sounds).
I think this is because I don't feel any particular need to emulate the Scots accents.

That is all.



neongrl
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28 Aug 2008, 7:15 am

No accent here... but I'm Canadian and I know a guy, likely AS/HFA, who's lived here all his life and he tends to talk with a southern-US accent - much like what you'd hear on something like the Andy Griffith show.



admoore
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28 Aug 2008, 7:26 am

my voice is normal i think but i cannot help talking like the people im talking to... if that makes sense i change the way i talk



MemberSix
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28 Aug 2008, 7:31 am

admoore wrote:
my voice is normal i think but i cannot help talking like the people im talking to... if that makes sense i change the way i talk

I think its a form of deference.

A recent study revealed that socially subordinate men adjust the basiness of their voice to that of the social superior (where it happens to be naturally deeper).
IOW, if the social superior has an unbassy squeak, the social subordinate will squeak too.

Interesting, eh ?

Me, I think it's the same thing happening with accents.

The social subordinate (us) changes his accent to comply with the social superior (them).

Those at the bottom (Aspies) will be well versed in speaking a multitude of different accents.



2ukenkerl
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28 Aug 2008, 7:37 am

MemberSix wrote:
You see, while America is a nation divided by race - England is a nation divided by class.


Actually, in the US, there IS a division by class(defined basically as income and/or basic education)

In fact, most of the "racial" stuff you hear is actually based on class, and they will, in turn, or if pressed, claim the class is based on race.

The class division affects ALL races in the US, INCLUDING white!

Of course, in britain the class is more often easily determined by accent, and in the US it might be determined by word choice, pronunciation, and actions(although the rich are now adopting things from the poor, and blurring THAT distinction).

BTW if you want to see some of the worst examples of US based "class" actions, etc... Just watch like "my name is earl", or jerry springer. There are ACTUALLY people that act like that!



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