WrongPlanet.net
WP Members: > 80,000



Aspie Affection

New Today: 6
New Yesterday: 26

Seeing differant colors through each eye. Previous  1, 2, 3  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wrong Planet Autism Forum Index -> General Autism Discussion     
Wolfpup
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Apr 15, 2007
Posts: 1637
Location: Central Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hyperlexian wrote:
i believe there is a reason for this, at least in its subtle permutations (slightly different colours in each eye). i think it has something to do with our binocular vision - if the colours were identical in each eye, we would not see in our usual three dimensions (like 3D glasses). don't remember where i read this.


It's our brain's processing + having two slightly different views that lets us perceive depth.

I'd assume most people see colors in both eyes identically (or close to it) though it makes sense it would be possible for the number or distribution of color receptors in both eyes not to be identical. Interesting too as it lets someone more easily understand how another person might see the world in different colors!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Julian94
Blue Jay
Blue Jay


Joined: Mar 30, 2010
Age: 20
Posts: 95
Location: Norway

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always assumed that that was due to the fact that I sometimes in my youth I would point a (>5 mW) red laser directly into my right eye.
_________________
You're unique, just like everybody else.
Not sure if I have it or not, + to lazy to get a diagnosis. (Nope not kidding.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Wolfpup
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Apr 15, 2007
Posts: 1637
Location: Central Illinois, USA

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could well be! NOT a great thing to do Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Daftwrist
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse


Joined: Dec 31, 2009
Posts: 31

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes I noticed this a while ago, but then I realised that it's probably because each eye is getting a different level of light exposure due to your position. So when you shut the one with more light you see more blue/green, and when you shut the eye that was getting more shadow / darkness, you see more orange/yellow (or the reverse I don't remember). If both eyes are getting the same light exposure (you are sitting directly in front of a light or out on a bright sunny day not in the shade), both eyes will see colours about equal.

It's due to dark adaption of the retina of the eye. The receptors will see colour differently depending on whether they are exposed to bright light or dim light (or no light/darkness). Each of our eyes are getting a slightly different dose of light because they are in different posotions, so if you have a light on the right side of your face your right eyes is getting more light than your left eye....try this, cover one eye with your hand for a few minutes so it can adapt to the darkness, then open it and cover your other eye, ...switch between them...the colours will look different one eye will see a greenish tint, the other a reddish tint...ok that's the best I can explain it.

Oh another thing I noticed, if you shut your eyes on a bright sunny day you still get light through your eyelids but it is tinted red due to blood vessels. Then when you open your eyes, everything will look greenish. I forget why but something about how your photoreceptors process colour. Similarly, they have optical illusions in psych books where you stare at this pattern with red stripes and then you look at a white plank space - the wall or something, and you see the after image of stripes but they'll be green instead of red. Photoreceptors are tricky like that.


Last edited by Daftwrist on Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:40 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
starquake
Raven
Raven


Joined: Jul 29, 2009
Posts: 122

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bye

Last edited by starquake on Tue Aug 17, 2010 9:15 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
hyperlexian
loves the man who typed too much and ran outta spa
Forum Moderator


Joined: Jul 22, 2010
Age: 42
Posts: 21997
Location: with bucephalus

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wolfpup wrote:
hyperlexian wrote:
i believe there is a reason for this, at least in its subtle permutations (slightly different colours in each eye). i think it has something to do with our binocular vision - if the colours were identical in each eye, we would not see in our usual three dimensions (like 3D glasses). don't remember where i read this.


It's our brain's processing + having two slightly different views that lets us perceive depth.

I'd assume most people see colors in both eyes identically (or close to it) though it makes sense it would be possible for the number or distribution of color receptors in both eyes not to be identical. Interesting too as it lets someone more easily understand how another person might see the world in different colors!

yes, that is the primary way in which we obtain our binocular vision, but i de believe that colour perception helps add depth. it is a phenomenon that has been observed for some length of time, but it is very difficult to quantize each person's variability (the same inherent problem exists in each person describing the way 'red' is perceived, for example).

here is a book from 1957 that refers to the phenomenon of inter-eye colour perception variability:

http://www.jstor.org/pss/1419574
_________________
on a break, so if you need assistance please contact another moderator from this list:
http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt237032.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
hyperlexian
loves the man who typed too much and ran outta spa
Forum Moderator


Joined: Jul 22, 2010
Age: 42
Posts: 21997
Location: with bucephalus

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hyperlexian wrote:
Wolfpup wrote:
hyperlexian wrote:
i believe there is a reason for this, at least in its subtle permutations (slightly different colours in each eye). i think it has something to do with our binocular vision - if the colours were identical in each eye, we would not see in our usual three dimensions (like 3D glasses). don't remember where i read this.


It's our brain's processing + having two slightly different views that lets us perceive depth.

I'd assume most people see colors in both eyes identically (or close to it) though it makes sense it would be possible for the number or distribution of color receptors in both eyes not to be identical. Interesting too as it lets someone more easily understand how another person might see the world in different colors!

yes, that is the primary way in which we obtain our binocular vision, but i de believe that colour perception helps add depth. it is a phenomenon that has been observed for some length of time, but it is very difficult to quantize each person's variability (the same inherent problem exists in each person describing the way 'red' is perceived, for example).

here is a book from 1957 that refers to the phenomenon of inter-eye colour perception variability:

http://www.jstor.org/pss/1419574


i also found some more information about the potential role of colour in binocular vision, though apparently it is still being debated:
http://jp.physoc.org/content/567/2/665.full
_________________
on a break, so if you need assistance please contact another moderator from this list:
http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt237032.html
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
katzefrau
heart of snow
Phoenix


Joined: Apr 12, 2010
Posts: 1834
Location: emerald city

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Daftwrist wrote:
Yes I noticed this a while ago, but then I realised that it's probably because each eye is getting a different level of light exposure due to your position. So when you shut the one with more light you see more blue/green, and when you shut the eye that was getting more shadow / darkness, you see more orange/yellow (or the reverse I don't remember). If both eyes are getting the same light exposure (you are sitting directly in front of a light or out on a bright sunny day not in the shade), both eyes will see colours about equal.


that makes sense.

i too have noticed the color discrepancy but right now colors look the same thru both eyes. so maybe we're just more inclined to notice the difference when it's there.

off topic but do most people see air molecules?? i have no idea what's normal anymore.
_________________
Now a penguin may look very strange in a living room, but a living room looks very strange to a penguin.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
CockneyRebel
Mick Avory, Sensitive brown-eyed Sweet Pea
Phoenix


Joined: Jul 18, 2004
Age: 39
Posts: 91094
Location: In a quiet and peaceful garden, where gentle Mick Avory-like Sweet Peas grow.

PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've noticed that, with my own eyes. I see warm colours, better with my left eye, and cool colours better, with my right eye.
_________________
The darling, unworldly Mick Avory with hands like shovels, who wouldn't dare choose to hurt a soul: I'm the cuddly, adorable Kink. Sweet Peas: http://s76.photobucket.com/albums/j37/Cocknee/Kinks/Sweet%20Pea%20Smileys/ Blog: http://ramblingsofasuccessfula
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
anthonylee
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker


Joined: Jun 08, 2008
Age: 50
Posts: 190

PostPosted: Tue Aug 17, 2010 1:53 am    Post subject: Seeing different colors through each eye. Reply with quote

I see slightly differnt colors in each eye , but it is very subtle. It is more noticable when the lighting is not the same on each side of me and what colors I'm looking at. I tend to see things a little less red in my left eye than my right eye. I found out that though I'm not colorblind , I have poor color discrimiation and am some what insensitive to red. My eyes are equal otherwise in strenth except for differing astigmatisms. I have no dominant eye! As for being considered normal in percieving colors there is a a lot of difference between having poor color perception and perfect color perception! I have read of cases, though rare of people who were color blind in one eye and normal in the other eye.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
pinkythealien
Emu Egg
Emu Egg


Joined: Mar 18, 2012
Age: 45
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2012 8:56 pm    Post subject: Thanks for this discussion Reply with quote

I also have this, very very slightly. I assumed it was a minor thing but also didn't know if anyone else had it, and had never heard anyone else mention it till now. Yay for the Internets!
I have actually noticed that I get a more pronounced effect when I am taking cough suppresant or an antihistamine. I wonder if the meds are affecting the superior colliculi on the brain stem, along with the nose and throat controls? (This is the kind of thing I tend to obsess about.)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wrong Planet Autism Forum Index -> General Autism Discussion   
Previous  1, 2, 3  

 
Read more Articles on Wrong Planet



Wrong Planet is a Registered Trademark.
Copyright 2004-2014, Wrong Planet, LLC and Alex Plank. Alex does public speaking for Autism.

Advertise on Wrong Planet

Alex Hotchalk / Glam 

Alex Plank  Aspie Affection 

Terms of Service - You must read this as a user of Wrong Planet | Privacy Policy

Subscribe: RSS Feed  Wrong Planet News  Wrong Planet Forums




fine art