WrongPlanet.net
WP Members: > 80,000



Aspie Affection

New Today: 6
New Yesterday: 33

What are "social cues"?
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wrong Planet Autism Forum Index -> General Autism Discussion     
TPE2
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Oct 21, 2008
Posts: 1530

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 7:39 am    Post subject: What are "social cues"? Reply with quote

I see constant references to people with AS having difficulty in understanding social cues.

What this, "social cues", exactly means? [I am not English-speaker]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BTDT
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Jul 27, 2010
Posts: 1029

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Non verbal hints to guide the conversation--looking bored when you want to change the topic, for instance.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Wallourdes
Klaymen
Phoenix


Joined: Jul 25, 2010
Age: 26
Posts: 4589
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 8:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Social cues are signals that are given, usually consciously during a social interaction that communicates a personís thoughts, or expected actions at certain intervals of a groupís activity.


I got this from http://www.pualingo.com/pua-definitions/social-cue/
_________________
"It all start with Hoborg, a being who had to create, because... he had to. He make the world full of beauty and wonder. This world, the Neverhood, a world where he could live forever and ever more!"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message MSN Messenger
Vector
Toucan
Toucan


Joined: Sep 14, 2009
Posts: 297
Location: San Jose, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Every conversation has two parts: content and relationship. Autistic people understand the content part of the conversation-- the things that people are talking about, like politics or shoes. We tend to miss the part of the conversation that is about the relationship between the people. Stuff like facial expressions, vocal tone, gestures, or even words that say something other than their direct meaning. People are animals when it comes to their emotions-- they do all these things that are like dogs wagging their tails or sniffing each other. Those animal things, which autistic people tend not to see or to interpret oddly, are called "social cues."
_________________
Landon Bryce
www.thAutcast.com
a Blogazine for the Aspergers and Autism Community
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Zedition
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse


Joined: Oct 13, 2010
Posts: 49

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The way I think of them, social cues are things people do to politely tell you things they don't want to say. I've learned loads of them over the years from watching people.

For example:
Don't make eye contact constantly. Do it in a repeating pattern. I do a three count, look away for one, four count, away for two, then repeat.
Also don't actually look at eyes. At least, I can't, it makes my skin crawl. I kind of look below one eye, but focus my eyes on a point that would be at the back of the person's head. My wife says it does look like I am making eye contact and she can't tell that her face is not in focus.
When speaking to somebody, hold eye contact for a count of three, then look away - that means you are ready to talk.
If somebody looks at their own body while talking to you (fingers, clothes, feet), they are bored and want to leave.
Opening your eyes wide means you are interested. Leaving them regular means bored.
Look up in the air if you want to keep talking but need a second to remember what the heck your point was. People think this means you are collecting your thoughts and won't start talking.
Hold eye contact for a count of only two when looking at a stranger. More than that and they think you are interested in them. Even if they look goofy.
Watch for flutters or ticks, that means you hit some kind of chord with what you just said. Since I don't actually look at eyes, I miss these a lot.

Voice tone and speed of speech is also a big non-verbal. I slow my rate of speech way, way down when speaking with NT's, about half what I do when speaking with peers. To learn how to use your tone to influence people's reactions, buy a dog or date somebody with kids. I learned oodles about tone after I had children.

Also body posture. I learned this from working with my son's friends. I'm a big guy, so I slouch now when I'm talking with subordinates, trying to literally "bring myself down to their level". Talking to superiors, I stand my full 6'3" and even puff my chest and shoulders just a pinch. Superiors respond well to an image of health and strength.

Where to hold my hands still confounds me. Most people seem to talk with thier hands, but I haven't figured out much about it. It seems to be very different between men and women on how your hands are used. I can 'lecture' well with my hands, when I'm giving a presentation like in a classroom setting. But one-on-one, I can't figure out what to do, if I use my hands to talk, I seem to intimidate women. If I don't use my hands, men start flagging dis-interest in what I have to say, or they get testy.

Body position is the other one. Face to face, Americans' want to stand half of their own body height apart, just barely in an arm's reach. Most Europeans are a about a hands width closer than this, Japanese like to be just out of reach, working with Chinese and Indian consultants really gives me the willies, these cultures practially touch body to body while talking.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wavefreak58
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Sep 27, 2010
Posts: 4419
Location: Western New York

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zedition wrote:

Don't make eye contact constantly. Do it in a repeating pattern. I do a three count, look away for one, four count, away for two, then repeat.


Good lord. If I tried to count off seconds of eye contact I wouldn't be able to listen to what they are saying. I can either hear you or look at your eyes.

Quote:

Also don't actually look at eyes. At least, I can't, it makes my skin crawl. I kind of look below one eye, but focus my eyes on a point that would be at the back of the person's head. My wife says it does look like I am making eye contact and she can't tell that her face is not in focus.


Not sure I can do this effectively either. If I was too comfortable with it I would appear to be staring at them unless I engaged in the counting exercise above. And then I would lose track of the conversation.

Quote:

When speaking to somebody, hold eye contact for a count of three, then look away - that means you are ready to talk.
If somebody looks at their own body while talking to you (fingers, clothes, feet), they are bored and want to leave.
Opening your eyes wide means you are interested. Leaving them regular means bored.
Look up in the air if you want to keep talking but need a second to remember what the heck your point was. People think this means you are collecting your thoughts and won't start talking.
Hold eye contact for a count of only two when looking at a stranger. More than that and they think you are interested in them. Even if they look goofy.
Watch for flutters or ticks, that means you hit some kind of chord with what you just said. Since I don't actually look at eyes, I miss these a lot.

Voice tone and speed of speech is also a big non-verbal. I slow my rate of speech way, way down when speaking with NT's, about half what I do when speaking with peers. To learn how to use your tone to influence people's reactions, buy a dog or date somebody with kids. I learned oodles about tone after I had children.

Also body posture. I learned this from working with my son's friends. I'm a big guy, so I slouch now when I'm talking with subordinates, trying to literally "bring myself down to their level". Talking to superiors, I stand my full 6'3" and even puff my chest and shoulders just a pinch. Superiors respond well to an image of health and strength.

Where to hold my hands still confounds me. Most people seem to talk with thier hands, but I haven't figured out much about it. It seems to be very different between men and women on how your hands are used. I can 'lecture' well with my hands, when I'm giving a presentation like in a classroom setting. But one-on-one, I can't figure out what to do, if I use my hands to talk, I seem to intimidate women. If I don't use my hands, men start flagging dis-interest in what I have to say, or they get testy.

Body position is the other one. Face to face, Americans' want to stand half of their own body height apart, just barely in an arm's reach. Most Europeans are a about a hands width closer than this, Japanese like to be just out of reach, working with Chinese and Indian consultants really gives me the willies, these cultures practially touch body to body while talking.


Too many rules. I'd rather have one or two friends that understand me as weird but OK, than try to deal with all that stuff. Clearly, this is not an option in any environment requiring interaction. No wonder I feel exhausted after such things.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Philologos
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Jan 22, 2010
Posts: 6980

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 2:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Social cues are what foreigners AND Aspies reading NTs AND NTs reading Aspies either do not see or misinterpret.

They are the bane of my existence [after Daylight saving]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
TPE2
Phoenix
Phoenix


Joined: Oct 21, 2008
Posts: 1530

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the explanations!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fethi
Emu Egg
Emu Egg


Joined: Sep 24, 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vector wrote:
Every conversation has two parts: content and relationship. Autistic people understand the content part of the conversation-- the things that people are talking about, like politics or shoes. We tend to miss the part of the conversation that is about the relationship between the people. Stuff like facial expressions, vocal tone, gestures, or even words that say something other than their direct meaning. People are animals when it comes to their emotions-- they do all these things that are like dogs wagging their tails or sniffing each other. Those animal things, which autistic people tend not to see or to interpret oddly, are called "social cues."


Hey Vector

thanks a lot for this wonderful explanation
I specifically enjoyed the "animals" part ... Laughing

I don't know whether you also are suffering from this syndrome but in any case this is exactly what a self aware Aspie thinks of people ... simply that they are as animals as animals!!! not so different in reality ...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Ellytoad
Velociraptor
Velociraptor


Joined: Apr 19, 2011
Age: 28
Posts: 424

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few times in the past, when I couldn't understand a certain hand movement, I would copy it. Kind of amusing now that I look back on it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
laustcawz
Emu Egg
Emu Egg


Joined: Sep 24, 2009
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2013 7:18 pm    Post subject: missing social cues Reply with quote

I've heard a lot about this, too, that autists/Aspergians "miss social cues". Whose social cues are these? Are they easy, obvious things to follow & recognize, or are they arbitrary social formalities that non-autists came up with?? I'd also suggest that the so-called "lack of empathy" may be subjective as well.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wrong Planet Autism Forum Index -> General Autism Discussion   

 
Read more Articles on Wrong Planet



Wrong Planet is a Registered Trademark.
Copyright 2004-2014, Wrong Planet, LLC and Alex Plank. Alex does public speaking for Autism.

Advertise on Wrong Planet

Alex Hotchalk / Glam 

Alex Plank  Aspie Affection 

Terms of Service - You must read this as a user of Wrong Planet | Privacy Policy

Subscribe: RSS Feed  Wrong Planet News  Wrong Planet Forums




fine art