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PostPosted: Wed Aug 25, 2010 12:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Believe me. You don't want to be both.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

my therapist told me that she loves working with mild aspies/ppl with aspie traits because they tend to be really sensitive. She said often these people are struggling so hard to be "normal" and can easily be crushed when they just can't do it.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 25, 2010 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm both things. I'm not sure if I actually have Asperger's , but I'm highly sensitive, sometimes so much that I can't contain my emotions....
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrXxx wrote:
CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:
Asperger's is completely different. The difference is in why we are sensitive. And not all us of are by the way. I'm extremely thick skinned. Wink


I don't see how. I think most of the people who are considered highly sensitive people sound like aspies. And no, not everyone has the same traits.


Please don't take offense to this, because I know I'm being blunt, but I just want to get an important point across as briefly as possible.

You need to research the matter more. Sounding similar and appearing similar to people who do not have Asperger's, is a common problem in non Aspies seeing or accepting that people who have Asperger's actually have it. If you aren't familiar with that fairly common knowledge, you really need to read a lot more about the subject. The reason you don't see how they are very different is because you don't yet know enough about it. Read read read, and then read some more. Invest in some books about it. It's the only way for anyone to learn the difference.

I'll say it again. The difference lies in WHY we are sensitive, if we even are. Not all of us are. I'm not. I used to be, but not anymore.

Most importantly: Sensitivity is not a required symptom of Asperger's Syndrome. It isn't even in the criteria, so this issue isn't relevant to whether anyone does or does not have Asperger's.

Sensitivity has nothing to do with having or not having Asperger's. Having Asperger's though, CAN be a very indirect cause of sensitivity. How it causes it is more complicated than typical sensitivity. Researching it or living it is the only real way to learn how and why that is.



Okay, that was just jerky. You may have a valid point, but I'm not writing a dissertation, so don't tell me I need to do more research. I only wanted to see what people thought, and share my opinion, even if I'm not an expert. Can we casually share our opinions here and propose ideas, even if we don't know everything about the topic?

Oh, and it's not just sensitivity. If the author of page I read is to be believed, HSPs supposedly have sensitivity to sensory stimuli, they often feel strangely different, they often have a much harder time fitting in. Some aspies can clearly fit that description. You can disagree without criticizing me.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:
CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:
Asperger's is completely different. The difference is in why we are sensitive. And not all us of are by the way. I'm extremely thick skinned. Wink


I don't see how. I think most of the people who are considered highly sensitive people sound like aspies. And no, not everyone has the same traits.


Please don't take offense to this, because I know I'm being blunt, but I just want to get an important point across as briefly as possible.

You need to research the matter more. Sounding similar and appearing similar to people who do not have Asperger's, is a common problem in non Aspies seeing or accepting that people who have Asperger's actually have it. If you aren't familiar with that fairly common knowledge, you really need to read a lot more about the subject. The reason you don't see how they are very different is because you don't yet know enough about it. Read read read, and then read some more. Invest in some books about it. It's the only way for anyone to learn the difference.

I'll say it again. The difference lies in WHY we are sensitive, if we even are. Not all of us are. I'm not. I used to be, but not anymore.

Most importantly: Sensitivity is not a required symptom of Asperger's Syndrome. It isn't even in the criteria, so this issue isn't relevant to whether anyone does or does not have Asperger's.

Sensitivity has nothing to do with having or not having Asperger's. Having Asperger's though, CAN be a very indirect cause of sensitivity. How it causes it is more complicated than typical sensitivity. Researching it or living it is the only real way to learn how and why that is.



Okay, that was just jerky. You may have a valid point, but I'm not writing a dissertation, so don't tell me I need to do more research. I only wanted to see what people thought, and share my opinion, even if I'm not an expert. Can we casually share our opinions here and propose ideas, even if we don't know everything about the topic?

Oh, and it's not just sensitivity. If the author of page I read is to be believed, HSPs supposedly have sensitivity to sensory stimuli, they often feel strangely different, they often have a much harder time fitting in. Some aspies can clearly fit that description. You can disagree without criticizing me.


It wasn't intended to be "jerky." I have no idea what I said that you took as criticism. You asked for opinions. I gave you mine. Then you said you didn't see how they could be different. I'm simply letting you know what it takes to come to see what you said you couldn't see. If you don't want to do any research on it, then all you have to go on are opinions, and that's your choice. If you want real answers, research is the way to go. It's that simple. If all you do is ask for opinions, then challenge them without even doing your own research, the whole discussion is nothing more than a meaningless argument.

I disagree with you because of what I have researched. You are just disagreeing. There's a huge difference.

An Oak tree and a Maple tree have many similarities. They are both trees. But an Oak is not a Maple. The differences between sensitivity and Asperger's are even stronger.

I'm not writing a dissertation either. These are your questions, so you should, if you really want answers, do a lot more reading about Autism. I'm not going to spend hours looking it all up for you. I've done it for myself. You can too.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrXxx wrote:
CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:
CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:
Asperger's is completely different. The difference is in why we are sensitive. And not all us of are by the way. I'm extremely thick skinned. Wink


I don't see how. I think most of the people who are considered highly sensitive people sound like aspies. And no, not everyone has the same traits.


Please don't take offense to this, because I know I'm being blunt, but I just want to get an important point across as briefly as possible.

You need to research the matter more. Sounding similar and appearing similar to people who do not have Asperger's, is a common problem in non Aspies seeing or accepting that people who have Asperger's actually have it. If you aren't familiar with that fairly common knowledge, you really need to read a lot more about the subject. The reason you don't see how they are very different is because you don't yet know enough about it. Read read read, and then read some more. Invest in some books about it. It's the only way for anyone to learn the difference.

I'll say it again. The difference lies in WHY we are sensitive, if we even are. Not all of us are. I'm not. I used to be, but not anymore.

Most importantly: Sensitivity is not a required symptom of Asperger's Syndrome. It isn't even in the criteria, so this issue isn't relevant to whether anyone does or does not have Asperger's.

Sensitivity has nothing to do with having or not having Asperger's. Having Asperger's though, CAN be a very indirect cause of sensitivity. How it causes it is more complicated than typical sensitivity. Researching it or living it is the only real way to learn how and why that is.



Okay, that was just jerky. You may have a valid point, but I'm not writing a dissertation, so don't tell me I need to do more research. I only wanted to see what people thought, and share my opinion, even if I'm not an expert. Can we casually share our opinions here and propose ideas, even if we don't know everything about the topic?

Oh, and it's not just sensitivity. If the author of page I read is to be believed, HSPs supposedly have sensitivity to sensory stimuli, they often feel strangely different, they often have a much harder time fitting in. Some aspies can clearly fit that description. You can disagree without criticizing me.


It wasn't intended to be "jerky." I have no idea what I said that you took as criticism. You asked for opinions. I gave you mine. Then you said you didn't see how they could be different. I'm simply letting you know what it takes to come to see what you said you couldn't see. If you don't want to do any research on it, then all you have to go on are opinions, and that's your choice. If you want real answers, research is the way to go. It's that simple. If all you do is ask for opinions, then challenge them without even doing your own research, the whole discussion is nothing more than a meaningless argument.

I disagree with you because of what I have researched. You are just disagreeing. There's a huge difference.

An Oak tree and a Maple tree have many similarities. They are both trees. But an Oak is not a Maple. The differences between sensitivity and Asperger's are even stronger.

I'm not writing a dissertation either. These are your questions, so you should, if you really want answers, do a lot more reading about Autism. I'm not going to spend hours looking it all up for you. I've done it for myself. You can too.


Look, if you're gonna play stupid and pretend it wasn't a dig, then why waste either of our time.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CaptainTrips222 wrote:
Okay, if you're gonna play stupid and pretend you it wasn't a dig, then why waste either of our time.


I am neither stupid, nor am I playing stupid.

If you want an apology, you've got it.

I can't pretend to know what I don't. I have no idea what I said that set you off. If I did, I would say so. You don't even know me. How could you possibly know what's going on in my head? Nothing I said was meant as a dig. I'm simply saying what I think. An opinion. I thought that's what you said you wanted. If I misinterpreted that, I'm sorry.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrXxx wrote:


How could you possibly know what's going on in my head?


The same way you somehow know how much research I've done on autism and HSP. You don't. You keep saying autism is more than sensitivity. I got it. Do YOU realize that HSP is more than sensitivity? That some of the traits sound awfully similar to aspergers? You didn't imply but stated that something I didn't know was common knowledge, and that, therefore, I needed to do my research. It smacked of condescension. I hope you're sincere when you honestly didn't mean it as an insult, because it sounded just rude.

But anyway, thank you for apologizing.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:


How could you possibly know what's going on in my head?


The same way you somehow know how much research I've done on autism and HSP. You don't. You keep saying autism is more than sensitivity. I got it. Do YOU realize that HSP is more than sensitivity? That some of the traits sound awfully similar to aspergers? You didn't imply but stated that something I didn't know was common knowledge, and that, therefore, I needed to do my research. It smacked of condescension. I hope you're sincere when you honestly didn't mean it as an insult, because it sounded just rude.

But anyway, thank you for apologizing.


I am absolutely sincere. I don't mean it at all. But I did know you might take it that way. Whenever I am brief, I tend to be blunt. I honestly don't know how to be short and sweet. I know how to be brief and too the point though, and having been through it enough, I know it's taken in ways I don't mean sometimes.

You're right. I have no idea how much research you've done. But I do know you are still questioning whether Autism and Asperger's could be sensitivity. I know I've learned it's much more than that, and is more the cause of sensitivity in Autistics that are sensitive.

I see by your profile you aren't sure if you have Asperger's or not, and I assume from that you are here to learn what you can about it. I'm pretty sure, like me when I first started looking into it, you have a lot of questions, and a lot of it is confusing and even seems conflicting. That's an assumption, I admit, but a fairly reasonable one considering I've seen the same questions, doubts, and confusion from many many posters both here and on other forums for the past three years. They aren't surprising questions. They are very common.

The reason I'm pushing you toward doing more research isn't to prove a point I have. It's not for me to prove anything. It's for you. It's honestly and hands down the best way to learn about it. If you read enough of the right stuff, you will find that the two (sensitivity, and Autism) are very different indeed. People who truly have Aspgerer's are not "just sensitive." Asperger's does not just go away by "toughening up." If what you seek is a better understanding of it all, there is no substitute for personal research. You will benefit from it more than anyone. That's why I'm being repetitive about it.

Can you deal with a highly technically worded book? It's around fifty bucks new, but I'm sure you could find a used copy much cheaper. Look for Autism and Asperger's syndrome, edited by Uta Frith. It's got the first English translation ever of Hans Asperger's work. Some parts of it are confusing, but if you look at the historical context of everything in it, it's extremely revealing. In other words, when you read it, think of the period in which what you are reading was written. Put it all in context. It helps to know that Asperger himself never named the disorder. Others did that later. Autism, when he wrote about it, didn't mean what it means now. All of that even I didn't know when I joined WP just a few months ago. I had it out with another user here because I thought he didn't know what he was talking about. I researched it more. He was right! Like I said. "No substitute..."

On a side note, something else occurred to me after looking this whole thread over. I think I may have come into this with a bit of a negative vibe, and here's why. We get a lot of posts from people with questions like yours.

"Are Aspies just oversensitive people?"
"Is it Asperger's or just low self esteem?"
"Hey all you Aspies! Have you tried positive thinking?"

I'm making all those up, but these are frequent themes. Sometimes, as it appears to be with you, the asker is just looking for answers, and hasn't learned a lot about Autism yet. Unfortunately, all to often, that's not the real motive behind the post. Too often, what the poster is really all about is coming here and trying to find an insidious way of telling us all our Autism is just our imagination, and all we need to do is toughen up and get some self esteem. I've seen it all, and I've heard it all. It isn't appreciated here any more than advice not asked for is taken well anywhere.

I don't think that's why you are asking though. But, I have to admit, all those many "other" kinds of post still come to mind when I see questions like that. I do think in the back of my head, the thought was lurking, "*&(*^^&%&%!!!! Not this bull**** again!"

Even though I try like hell to assume the best of everyone, I guess sometimes I can't help some of that underlying annoyance showing in my posts. I think that's what happened here. The question, the relatively low number of posts you had at the time, both are hallmark signs of people with agendas who come here all the time, with a mission of teaching us something they think we haven't heard before, and with the assumption we don't have a clue what we're talking about.

Yeah, I admit that was my first reaction. But I did try to keep it from showing, with the hopes you were not one of "them."

Looks like it sneaked through. I did not mean it too.

I asked a few questions when I first got here a few months ago that blew up in my face for much the same reason. It's a little ironic that here I'm the one coming across like those who nearly bit my head off then. Embarassed

Anyway, my only intention really was to help. Nothing more or less. Take it for what it's worth. Very Happy
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

very sensitive ppl tend to get hurt feelings very quickly and this leads to being very defensive.... Shocked just an observation.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Point taken. As I mentioned earlier I'm not all that sensitive anymore, though I was when I was younger. Somehow I got past that, which was good for me, but it comes across kind of crass sometimes (especially in writing). It's never intentional, 'cause I hate that crap.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MrXxx wrote:
CaptainTrips222 wrote:
MrXxx wrote:


How could you possibly know what's going on in my head?


The same way you somehow know how much research I've done on autism and HSP. You don't. You keep saying autism is more than sensitivity. I got it. Do YOU realize that HSP is more than sensitivity? That some of the traits sound awfully similar to aspergers? You didn't imply but stated that something I didn't know was common knowledge, and that, therefore, I needed to do my research. It smacked of condescension. I hope you're sincere when you honestly didn't mean it as an insult, because it sounded just rude.

But anyway, thank you for apologizing.


I am absolutely sincere. I don't mean it at all. But I did know you might take it that way. Whenever I am brief, I tend to be blunt. I honestly don't know how to be short and sweet. I know how to be brief and too the point though, and having been through it enough, I know it's taken in ways I don't mean sometimes.

You're right. I have no idea how much research you've done. But I do know you are still questioning whether Autism and Asperger's could be sensitivity. I know I've learned it's much more than that, and is more the cause of sensitivity in Autistics that are sensitive.

I see by your profile you aren't sure if you have Asperger's or not, and I assume from that you are here to learn what you can about it. I'm pretty sure, like me when I first started looking into it, you have a lot of questions, and a lot of it is confusing and even seems conflicting. That's an assumption, I admit, but a fairly reasonable one considering I've seen the same questions, doubts, and confusion from many many posters both here and on other forums for the past three years. They aren't surprising questions. They are very common.

The reason I'm pushing you toward doing more research isn't to prove a point I have. It's not for me to prove anything. It's for you. It's honestly and hands down the best way to learn about it. If you read enough of the right stuff, you will find that the two (sensitivity, and Autism) are very different indeed. People who truly have Aspgerer's are not "just sensitive." Asperger's does not just go away by "toughening up." If what you seek is a better understanding of it all, there is no substitute for personal research. You will benefit from it more than anyone. That's why I'm being repetitive about it.

Can you deal with a highly technically worded book? It's around fifty bucks new, but I'm sure you could find a used copy much cheaper. Look for Autism and Asperger's syndrome, edited by Uta Frith. It's got the first English translation ever of Hans Asperger's work. Some parts of it are confusing, but if you look at the historical context of everything in it, it's extremely revealing. In other words, when you read it, think of the period in which what you are reading was written. Put it all in context. It helps to know that Asperger himself never named the disorder. Others did that later. Autism, when he wrote about it, didn't mean what it means now. All of that even I didn't know when I joined WP just a few months ago. I had it out with another user here because I thought he didn't know what he was talking about. I researched it more. He was right! Like I said. "No substitute..."

On a side note, something else occurred to me after looking this whole thread over. I think I may have come into this with a bit of a negative vibe, and here's why. We get a lot of posts from people with questions like yours.

"Are Aspies just oversensitive people?"
"Is it Asperger's or just low self esteem?"
"Hey all you Aspies! Have you tried positive thinking?"

I'm making all those up, but these are frequent themes. Sometimes, as it appears to be with you, the asker is just looking for answers, and hasn't learned a lot about Autism yet. Unfortunately, all to often, that's not the real motive behind the post. Too often, what the poster is really all about is coming here and trying to find an insidious way of telling us all our Autism is just our imagination, and all we need to do is toughen up and get some self esteem. I've seen it all, and I've heard it all. It isn't appreciated here any more than advice not asked for is taken well anywhere.

I don't think that's why you are asking though. But, I have to admit, all those many "other" kinds of post still come to mind when I see questions like that. I do think in the back of my head, the thought was lurking, "*&(*^^&%&%!!!! Not this bull**** again!"

Even though I try like hell to assume the best of everyone, I guess sometimes I can't help some of that underlying annoyance showing in my posts. I think that's what happened here. The question, the relatively low number of posts you had at the time, both are hallmark signs of people with agendas who come here all the time, with a mission of teaching us something they think we haven't heard before, and with the assumption we don't have a clue what we're talking about.

Yeah, I admit that was my first reaction. But I did try to keep it from showing, with the hopes you were not one of "them."

Looks like it sneaked through. I did not mean it too.

I asked a few questions when I first got here a few months ago that blew up in my face for much the same reason. It's a little ironic that here I'm the one coming across like those who nearly bit my head off then. Embarassed

Anyway, my only intention really was to help. Nothing more or less. Take it for what it's worth. Very Happy


I'll revise my stance a little for clarity. I've read about HSP, and I know it's not in the DSM IV, and it's not considered an actual diagnosis. From what I've read, people with aspergers and people who claim to fit the criteria for HSP seem to have similar complaints regarding social interaction. They seem to have an unusually hard time reading situations and fitting in. It can be debilitating in some cases. Some HSPs even have sensory issues, with bright light and loud noises. Here's what I think; I suspect that maybe some people who would identify themselves as HSP may actually be on the spectrum.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 2:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CaptainTrips222 wrote:
I'll revise my stance a little for clarity. I've read about HSP, and I know it's not in the DSM IV, and it's not considered an actual diagnosis. From what I've read, people with aspergers and people who claim to fit the criteria for HSP seem to have similar complaints regarding social interaction. They seem to have an unusually hard time reading situations and fitting in. It can be debilitating in some cases. Some HSPs even have sensory issues, with bright light and loud noises. Here's what I think; I suspect that maybe some people who would identify themselves as HSP may actually be on the spectrum.


Oh sure! I think the reverse is often true too.

I'm certain the two could be easily confused, because coming to an accurate understanding the difference is not an easy task. There is a difference though. Unfortunately, pointing out the difference isn't as easy as, say, posting a link or two. It might take several, or many articles and books, reading them all, and putting the jigsaw pieces together is several different ways before you can see it. That's how it was for me anyway. It might be easier for you and some other people. It was so hard for me though, it's even harder for me to explain it to anyone else. That's why I've been answering as I have. It would be better for you to do it yourself, or have somebody else pop in with well organized evidence than for me to do it, because I'm more likely to confuse the hell out of you.

I get it in my own head now. It was really hard for others to get it through to me. Many of them confused me for a while. I had to figure it out on my own, because I'm the only one who knows how to feed my brain the way it needs to be fed. I'm figuring the same is probably true for you, so digging around and reading on your own is probably going to confuse you less than if I were to explain it.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only thing an HSP shares with someone else is possible sensory sensitivity, and I read you dont even have to have ALL the areas of sensitivity to be an HSP...definitely a difference. theres emotional sensitivity, and features in HSP cause them to be more empathic and intuitive than the average human so some say in a way there are opposites in it.

Wow what the hell? I think we are talking about different HSPs, no HSP stuff I read about said anything about difficulty in social interactions or understanding, I dont even think there is one for that imo... being sensitive to input though and stuff (hmm wow even goes for verbal input, criticism etc, but I meant the input of a room) might cause some to hang back in the classroom while others are out everywhere talking, doesnt always mean theyre shy, just need a bit of space
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

" According to Elaine N. Aron and colleagues as well as other researchers, highly sensitive people, who comprise about a fifth of the population, may process sensory data much more deeply and thoroughly due to a biological difference in their nervous systems.[1] This is a specific trait with key consequences that in the past has often been confused with innate shyness, social anxiety problems, inhibitedness, or even social phobia and innate fearfulness, introversion, and so on.[2] The existence of the trait of innate sensitivity was demonstrated using a test that was shown to have both internal and external validity.[3] Although the term is primarily used to describe humans, the trait is present in nearly all higher animals.

The term "highly sensitive person" was coined by Dr. Elaine N. Aron in 1996, and the name is gaining popularity because it presents the trait in a positive light. It posits that shyness, inhibition, and fearfulness may or may not be acquired by highly sensitive people and animals, depending on environmental challenges. Other names used to describe the trait in literature include "introverted emotional temperament", "chronic cortical/cortisol arousal", "hypervigilance", and "innate shyness".

A number of books have been written on the topic, for example "Help Is On Its Way" by Jenna Forrest, "The Highly Sensitive Person's Survival Guide" with forward by Elaine Aron, and "The Highly Sensitive Person's Companion" by Ted Zeff, PhD.

Dr. Aron describes the opposite end of the spectrum, "the opposite of a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) is a person who takes many risks, that is, acts without reflecting very much. An HSP who is an HSS (High Sensation Seeker) also will find ways to have lots of new experiences, but won't take a lot of unreflected-upon risks."[4] She also cites studies involving other animals ranging from mammals to houseflies and goldfish.[5]

Contents [hide] "

"Research
The research on sensory-processing sensitivity, however, builds on Eysenck's views on introversion and arousal and Gray's work on the inhibition system. This research in turn builds on Pavlov's work on sensory response to both physical and mental over-stimulation, and work by Jung and his contemporaries differentiating extroverted and introverted cognitive sensitivity types.[9] This research shows that about 15-20% of humans and higher animals have a nervous system that is more sensitive to subtleties. This means that regular sensory information is processed and analyzed to a greater extent, which contributes to creativity, intuition, sensing implications and attention to detail, but which may also cause quick over-stimulation and over-arousal.[5] "
"Zoologists are aware that notions of shyness and boldness are anthropomorphic (as exemplified by the use of quotation marks, above; "personality" is another term used with quotation marks). Some animals and even insects were shown to get survival advantages (avoidance of dangers) and even, as a consequence, reproductive advantages (availability for "exuberant" courtship behaviours) from being "shy".[8] Faced with this apparent misnaming of a basic survival strategy, Aron and colleagues developed the notion of high sensitivity, expanding on Jung's suggestion of the trait of innate sensitiveness, which he distinguished from his own notion of introversion. In support of this distinction, Aron showed that the Highly Sensitive Person Scale identified a sizable proportion of extroverted sensitive persons (30%). In addition, Aron provides evidence supporting that highly sensitive persons can also be highly sensitive to favourable social cues and respond with traits of extroversion.[9]"
This temperament may also have some correlation with continuously high cortisol levels, which may cause hypervigilance and susceptibility to trauma, or the same traumas may encourage hypervigilance, which in turn may contribute to high cortisol. Being highly sensitive may amplify or create psychological issues when over-arousal occurs. The ability to unconsciously or semi-consciously process environmental subtleties often contributes to an HSP seeming "gifted" or possessing a "sixth sense". Sensitivity is often confused with shyness, but 30% of HSPs have extroverted personalities. Another common misconception is that only females can be HSPs; there are roughly the same number of male HSPs as female. The percentage appears to hold true for all animals possessing this trait

Sorry about the huge paragraph, but I bolded a few things to help. I just think some thoughts need to be corrected
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