Hypotonia - Low Muscle Tone



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nettiespaghetti
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Thu Aug 21, 2008 10:32 pm

It wasn't until I was an adult that a doctor told me I had very low muscle tone. It's funny at the time I actually felt annoyed and a little embarrassed. Like he was insinuating that I don't do anything except sit around because that's far from the truth. At that time I was working 50+ hours a week and was killing myself to earn money so I thought to myself "how can this be?" But now I've learned that oftentimes children with autism have low muscle tone. I guess mine was severe because I can function. But it certainly explains alot. I researched it and it usually makes a person unsually clumsy, they may even have trouble talking (I've noticed no matter how hard I try I don't really talk extremely well...like I can't enunciate like I should). Not to mention I've always had problems with fatigue and it says that low muscle tone can cause a person to become easily exhausted. And it goes on to explain more if you look it up on wikipedia.
I just wondered if anyone else was actually diagnosed with this. I wish I was as a child because I really believe physical therapy would have helped me.


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n4mwd
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:48 am

I have AS and have always had low muscle tone although I have never been specifically diagnosed with it.



NDakotaQueen
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 6:33 am

My son who is just about to turn 11 years old has always had low muscle tone, and tires easily from physical activity. He has never been diagnosed with this, it's more or less just something I've noticed. It's very interesting that it may be tired to his AS. Certainly something that perhaps I'll bring up with his physicians, as you mention perhaps physical therapy could help improve the situation for him; which in turn could improve his activity at recess, participation in sports, PE class, etc.



jat
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 6:47 am

My grandson, age 7, (PDD-NOS) was diagnosed with hypotonia when he was 4. He received PT and OT for a while, both of which were very helpful. The PT was for a much shorter period of time, but the OT was also helpful for the hypotonia - as well as other issues. In addition to core muscle deficits, he has loose joints. This meant that he had the flexibility of a much younger child, which sounds good, but can be problematic.



Litguy
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 7:31 am

Both of my sons, both of whom are autistic, have hypotonia. They both have received PT, OT, and Speech. I'm sure that the PT and OT have helped.

My older son is very flexible, pretty much a contortionist, because of his low muscle tone.

Hypotonia does not make you weak, as evidenced by my younger son, but it does affect your coordination, balance, and stamina.

As for me, I was always the least capable student in grammar school or high school gym by a big stretch. I've never been able to ride a bicycle, and I now know that I have a very poor sense of balance. So, while it wasn't something that would be diagnosed fifty+years ago, I suspect I have hypotonia as well.



dbzgirl
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 4:46 pm

I have a low motor/muscle tone, even though I haven't been officially diagnosed with it.



techstepgenr8tion
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 7:28 pm

:roll:

Yeah, I've been dealing with this as well. Weird that it could effect speech, it probably used to with me. On the other hand, with working out and all, I'd like to think I can work around at least the physical - dumb bulk just looks sloppy, if I start seeing that I'm getting that more than anything I'll just start repping it out more; whatever I have to do I'll do it.



release_the_bats
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Fri Aug 22, 2008 8:20 pm

Had it as a kid. Don't have it now.



ssenkrad
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Sat Aug 23, 2008 10:26 pm

I have a question for those with hypotonia or those that know a bit about it: are all kids with hypotonia skinny, or is it possible to be chubby and still have the condition? I'm trying to be an armchair physician and determine whether my friend's 13 year old nephew has the condition (he does, for sure, have AS).



jat
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Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:29 am

It is NOT necessaary to be skinny to have hypotonia.



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